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About

Multimedia storytelling can be a source of empowerment for Indigenous youth, and a collaborative co-creation process with post-secondary students can serve as a platform for mutual understanding, respect, and healing, and ultimately contributes to reconciliation. This research cluster was created to explore a unique approach for engaging Indigenous youth to collaborate with undergraduate students to co-create multimedia stories that provide insight into their shared understanding of issues relating to global sustainable development.

 

The complementary skills and experiences of this team will allow us to engage youth from northern Indigenous communities to work (virtually) with Carleton students from multiple disciplines to articulate their shared vision of a sustainable future. Their multimedia stories will be uploaded to a curated website that will be linked to other initiatives that amplify youth voices across the north.

 

Development of a multidisciplinary and multimedia co-creation methodology, together with thematic analyses of the vision of sustainable development conveyed in youths’ stories will form the basis for the team’s further engagement in Indigenous community-led participatory research projects. Working together across disciplines, we will not only contribute to advancing systemic efforts to decolonization and reconciliation with Indigenous Peoples through research and education, but in so doing, co-develop a collaborative program of research and development promoting social equity and wellness, economic development, and environmental protection.